technology

Clarifications

Clarifications

Left: Eirik Newth. Right: Me. Easy mistake; could happen to anyone, we’re so alike. Except that, y’know, he’s a genius. Here (with some corrections), in case anybody else interpreted my posts from this weekend in similar ways, is a way-too-long comment I just posted in response to Doyce Testerman’s Publishing, Charlotte, and John. You should […]

What’s been gnawing at me lately

What’s been gnawing at me lately

One of the things that I find gets more difficult year after year—and I can’t tell if this is more because I’m getting older, or because I’m letting myself be pelted with information faster and harder than ever before, or because I don’t write as regularly as I used to—is synthesizing ideas. I spend hours […]

“books do certain things well and digital technologies do other things well”

“books do certain things well and digital technologies do other things well”

There’s a fab article hidden behind the Chronicle of Higher Education paywall: Some years ago, Terry Belanger found a striking way to reveal the reverence that many citizens of the digital age continue to feel for old books. It is a sentiment he finds fascinating but only rarely appropriate or useful. Belanger, who retired in […]

Waveitations

Update: Okay, okay, David Lawson had the patience to build a proper website to do this, so I hereby recommend that you swap Wave invitations over there instead of through my improvised gig: WaveShare.org. If anybody here is pining for a Google Wave invitation, some friends and I have pooled our resources and are filling […]

That part of the future which is here today

That part of the future which is here today

As you may have gathered, if you’ve been following along, the reason I no longer post much around here is that I’m in grad school, in a program that doesn’t have anything to do with books. Not usually, anyway. It’s a two-year master’s deal, and I have to come up with a thesis sometime in […]

California, here I come!

California, here I come!

Now I know what I’ll be doing next time I’m in SF: Tim James of Taurus Bookbindery has opened the American Bookbinders Museum. The Chronicle reports. In the museum sits an 800-pound Imperial arming press from 1832 that James bought and had shipped from France three years ago. Asked how expensive that was, he answers […]

When, not if

When, not if

Today over tea I was holding forth about backup methods, which reminded me that I’ve long meant to post something about how I’ve been handling it. To wit: right now, I’ve got a two-part system—constant partial backup online via SugarSync and less frequent but complete offline backup using Time Machine and an external hard drive. […]

The future of publishing is here today!

The future of publishing is here today!

The oddest thing about the newly announced winner of Bookseller magazine’s annual Diagram Prize for Oddest Book Title of the Year is not its title, The 2009–2014 World Outlook for 60-Milligram Containers of Fromage Frais, but rather that its author, Professor Philip M Parker of the French business school Insead, has produced more than 200,000 […]

Weapons of mass respiration

Edith Kollath’s show is at Dam, Stuhltrager Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, until December 14. Read at NYC Resistor about the zany TSA adventure she had when she tried to take these books to Germany for a show. Via Bre Pettis, who made the above video.

“I’ve got science for any occasionPostulating theorems, formulating equations”

“I’ve got science for any occasion
Postulating theorems, formulating equations”

This is so wonderfully geeky I can barely stand it: Last week I mentioned the atomic pen, which scientists used to construct some awfully tiny letters one atom at a time. These are small letters indeed: measuring two nanometers in height, they’re about 1/40000 the thickness of a human hair, which surely gives their inventor […]