Are you a bookfuturist?

Old news but good news:

I also want Bookfuturism.com to be a kind of social network for Bookfuturists like me. There are clear markets for writing by techno­logical triumphalists (I call these guys and girls technofuturists) and doomsayers (when it comes to reading, this group can be called book­servatives). It’s easy to give a thumbs-up or thumbs-down to new technology; it’s a lot harder to try to engage with its strengths and weaknesses, to think of ways it could work better, to situate it in his­tory, to study its effect on a culture. Bookfuturists, though, being equally people of the screen and the page, who know that both screens and pages are as varied and self-differentiated as the act of reading itself, are well situated to offer those readings. However, our status as members of two worlds makes it hard for us. We’re the humanists who can’t put down our iPhones, the tech geeks who read Proust. We don’t fit in at the faculty club or at a technology trade show. We have a hard time explaining to our friends and families why we collect card catalogs and buy two copies of used books — one to read, another to feed to the two-sided scan­ner. We’re the nerds among nerds. This is also why I wanted to start this site. Because — and this might sound hokey, but I mean every word of it — there’s no reason why any of us should ever feel alone.

—“Building Communities: Introducing Bookfuturism.com,” Tim Carmody, Snarkmarket, December 10, 2009

Awww.

Via Andrew Simone, who’s all over it.

Photo: Girl inspectors at the Long Beach, Calif., plant of Douglas Aircraft Company make a careful check of center wings for C-47 transport planes (LOC) by Alfred T. Palmer; no known copyright restrictions.

One Response

  1. Victoria Sandbrook
    Victoria Sandbrook February 2, 2010 at 9:39 am |

    Ooo. Thanks for the link! Off to peruse…

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